About - Beth Joyner Waldron

Beth Joyner Waldron is a North Carolina based writer and photographer. 

Published written worksi nclude: USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Christian Science Monitor, Circulation, HemOnc Today, KevinMD, CardioExchange and numerous regional publications.

Through her photography, Beth  hopes to inspire others to appreciate the diversity and beauty of North Carolina wildlife.  Her favorite photographic subjects are  raptors (birds of prey).  Published and exhibited photographs include: 

The Halle Cultural Arts Center, Apex, NC September 6 - October 11, 2019 Annual Juried Show, "Barred Owl at Sunrise" and "Marsh Rabbit"

"Into the Wild"  Chapel Hill Magazine, January/February 2018 pps 30-34  

The ArtsCenter’s Annual Community Art Exhibit in the Nicholson Gallery, December 1-22, 2017 "Haw River Heron"

Speaking:   Beth has engaged and motivated diverse audiences through talks for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), Bristol Myers Squibb, Pfizer, Premier Health Care Alliance, and PBS.

Career:  Prior to pursuing her passions of photography and writing, Waldron was a health care policy  administrator, co-founding  a medical education program at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Clot Connect, which reached over 4 million persons in 135 countries within its first four years.  Waldron is a member of the Clinical Practice Guideline Panel on Thrombophilia with the American Association of Hematology ASH (2015-2018), advising in the development of evidence based clinical practice guidelines on VTE.  She has previously been a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Blood Disorders (CDC DBD) Expert Panel on Prevention Research, an advisor on Patient and Family Engagement to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) Partnership for Patients initiative targeting hospital-acquired conditions, and a member of National Quality Forum (NQF) Affinity Groups on venous thromboembolism and adverse drug events.